Tag Archives: Asian Civilisations Museum

Singapore Heritage Festival 2017 @ Singapore River

The Singapore Heritage Festival 2017 is now entering into her final weekend, this Saturday 13th May and Sunday 14th May, consisting of many different festivities, performances, fun, food and celebration, with the Singapore River being the main attraction for this final Singapore Heritage Festival 2017 weekend.

Taking place at Singapore River this weekend, organised by Asian Civilisations Museum, it’s going to be transformed and brought back in time to the era when the Singapore River was a thriving hub that helped to define Singapore’s status as a trading port and one of the cross roads of the world shipping routes. At where the Asian Civilisations Museum is located, Singapore Heritage Festival 2017 final weekend takes place on Saturday 13th and Sunday 14th May, they are taking over the space, bringing visitors back in time to learn and understand Singapore’s early history, heritage and culture of the Singapore River through the activities, performances and of course, delicious food.

What are some of the festivities, performances and fun that you can expect when you visit Singapore Heritage Festival 2017 at Singapore River from 12th to 13th May 2017?

  • Singapore River Performances

Asian Civilisations Museum

Various timings

Free admission

The Asian Civilisations Museum presents a series of performances related to, and inspired by, food stories and migratory cultures.

The performances include:

  • Through My Eyes

by Act 3 International

12 May | 7.30pm

13 May | 3.30pm and 7.30pm

Asian Civilisations Museum (Outdoors), Hardcourt

Meet three living statues, and listen to them bring the history of Empress Place to life. Revisit hawkers by the river, the old Immigration department, and the government offices of bygone years.

  • Part I: The Dream

by TO ensemble

13 May | 2pm and 4.30pm

Asian Civilisations Museum, Level 1, Contemporary Gallery

Spice up your afternoon with fusion music that explores the founding of the Lion City.

  • Part II: Port City

by TO ensemble

13 May | 3pm and 5.30pm

Asian Civilisations Museum, Level 2, Foyer

Be transported back to the hustle and bustle of the old Singapore River scene, and experience its growth over the years through this multicultural musical performance.

  • Sounds of the Island

by TCR Music Pte Ltd

12 and 13 May | 10pm | Asian Civilisations Museum (Outdoors), Hardcourt

& 13 May | 6pm   | Asian Civilisations Museum, Level 2, Foyer

Sing along to Xinyao, Singapore Mandarin pop tunes, surrounded by the river, food, and people that are distinct to the island.

  • A Banquet of Songs

by Vox Camerata

13 May | 1.30pm and 4pm

Asian Civilisations Museum, Level 2, Foyer

Groove to a delectable collection of folk tunes, as this a cappella group tickles your aural palate with songs of adventure, travel, and longing.

  • Museum of Eating

Asian Civilisations Museum

Date & Time: 28 April – 14 May | Throughout museum hours

Free admission

We love our Singapore food, we eat a lot, however, do we know more about food, the processes, habits, quirks and practices here in Singapore? Visit the Museum of Eating inside the Asian Civilisations Museum to find out more!

  • Masak Makan Trail

Asian Civilisations Museum, Level 1, Central Staircase

Date & Time: 12 and 13 May | Throughout museum hours

For children only

This fun activity would be ideal for parents bringing their children to Singapore Heritage Festival 2017 at the Singapore River.

Question: “Do you know why the spouts of coffee pots connect near the top of the pot, and tea pots from the bottom?”

You can find the answer by going on a self-guided trail through the Asian Civilisations Museum to discover the answer!

  • Somewhere Around Here

Asian Civilisations Museum (Outdoors)

Date & Time: 28 April – 14 May | Daily

Free admission

Photography enthusiasts, history, heritage, conservation and preservation enthusiasts, this photographic installation will definitely interest you. Walk around the environment around the Asian Civilisations Museum, discover how the surroundings around it had changed over time, through archival photos. Remember to check out the stories and anecdotes from the Oral History archives.

  • Outdoor Film Screening

Asian Civilisations Museum (Outdoors)

Date & Time: 12 & 13 May | 7.30pm – 10pm

Free admission

Watching movies under the stars, have you tried it before? It’s been a long time since I went to watch a movie under the stars! At Singapore Heritage Festival 2017 at the Singapore River, catch the local films being screened!

  • Kway Chap (2015)

by Sun Koh (15 minutes)

12 May | 7.30pm

Asian Civilisations Museum (Outdoors), ACM Green

Even though filmmaker Sun Koh grew up in a family of famous kway chap hawkers, she never made a film about them. But now she makes a last-ditch attempt to document the memories of her family and their livelihood. But many of the places where they started the trade no longer exist – is she too late?

  • Old Friends (2015)

by Royston Tan (67 minutes)

12 May | 8pm

Asian Civilisations Museum (Outdoors), ACM Green

From the creators of Old Places and Old Romances comes the final instalment of the trilogy: Old Friends. Savour the stories of those who pioneered the rich, authentic flavours of traditional Singaporean cuisine – and those lucky enough to taste them – in this evocative film by Royston Tan and his team. 

  • The Missing Ingredient (2016)

by Wang Eng Eng (19 minutes)

13 May | 7.30pm

Asian Civilisations Museum (Outdoors), ACM Green

The filmmaker follows the struggles of her cousin as he prepares for the Mid-Autumn festival in Singapore. His challenge – recreating the family’s signature salt and pepper moon cake. His efforts are subjected to criticism by the rest of the family, who feel he doesn’t know the recipe. The expectations of continuing a culinary tradition weigh heavily upon the shoulders of her cousin once again this Mid-Autumn.

  • Wanton Mee (2015)

by Eric Khoo (71 minutes)

13 May | 8pm

Asian Civilisations Museum (Outdoors), ACM Green

Wanton Mee presents the journey of Koh Chun Feng, who takes his camcorder with him to local food stalls. He begins to amass the stories of the stall owners, and hidden within those, the history of how Singaporean dishes were created.

Last but not least, when you visit Singapore Heritage Festival 2017 at the Singapore River, YOU CANNOT MISS THIS!

  • New Empress Place Food Centre

Asian Civilisations Museum (Outdoors)

Date & Time: 12 May | 7pm – 10.30pm

& 13 May | 5pm – 10.30pm

Free admission

Do you remember the Empress Place Food Centre which used to be in front of the Former Empress Place Building (now known as the Asian Civilisations Museum)? I still have some memories of this place when I was a young kid!

Now, you can relive those memories again, with the New Empress Place Food Centre! Let me show you, some photographs of the delicious local food that you can enjoy when you visit!

This is the final weekend of Singapore Heritage Festival 2017, with Singapore River being the spotlight! Come on down, visit and enjoy yourselves with your family, relatives and loved ones! Do visit the Singapore Heritage Festival website for more details of activities and events taking place at other locations too!

Singapore Heritage Festival 2017 @ Singapore River (organised by Asian Civilisations Museum)

Date & Time:

  • 12 May: 7pm – 10.30pm
  • 13 May: 1pm – 10.30pm

Free admission to the whole museum during the festival, including the Joseon Korea special exhibition.

Visit www.heritagefestival.sg for more details.

* Information courtesy of National Heritage Board *

Festa di Papia Kristang 20-21 May 2017

The human race and society had evolved, transformed and changed tremendously over the centuries. Our living, the food we eat, an immense number of inventions and innovations, how we live as a society. Through the test of time, we had seen, learn and gain many things, as well as, losing many things in the world. One part of the human race around the world that is in danger of losing it is the art of language.

The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) recognises this area of huge and grave concern. They have a website dedicated to endangered languages around the world. Inevitably, probably a lot of us around the world might not be too concerned with the loss of languages. This is something that we all need to stand up and take a look into as well.

In Singapore, do we have languages that are endangered of being lost forever? Yes, there are! I was introduced to this language by my friend Ida, she shared briefly with us, a group of fellow heritage enthusiast about this language. I will be the first to confess that I never heard of this language before. What is the name of this language?

This is Kristang, a 500 year old critically-endangered heritage language of the Portuguese-Eurasian community in Singapore and Malacca. While I do know about the Eurasian community in Singapore, I never know about their language Kristang.

Festa di Papia Kristang – 1st Kristang Language Festival will be held at the Asian Civilisations Museum from 20th to 21st May 2017. I would like to take this opportunity to help publicise Festa di Papia Kristang and to help raise awareness of endangered languages. This event is open to all, regardless of heritage, experience, and language, who appreciates history, heritage, culture, conservation and preservation.

What is the Kristang language all about?

The language was once widely spoken in the Portuguese-Eurasian community in Singapore and Malacca until the 1930s; however, in Singapore at present, the language is unrecognised nationally and institutionally, intergenerational transmission of the language has ceased, and few Singaporeans even know it exists. Kristang, like every community language, represents a crucial and intangible part of the heritage of the Portuguese-Eurasian community, and immediate preservation and revitalisation efforts are required if the language is to be saved from extinction. The Kodrah†Kristang (‘Awaken, Kristang’) long-term revitalisation initiative thus seeks to revitalise the language to a more healthy state by 2035.

* *Information courtesy of Kodrah Kristang**

What does the Kristang Language Festival hopes to address and achieve?

  1. promoting awareness of the critically endangered status of Kristang
  2. encouraging the preservation of Kristang among Singaporeans of Portuguese-Eurasian descent.
  3. developing in all Singaporeans an awareness of and respect for the value of the heritage of our different races and ethnic communities, including language and culture-specific knowledge.
  4. seeding awareness of Kristang’s existence into broader Singaporean public discourse such that the preservation of the language starts to accumulate both institutional support and support from the general public.

* *Information courtesy of Kodrah Kristang**

There are a number of different events and activities lined up for Kristang Language Festival 2017 on 20th to 21st May 2017. For more information, check out the URL links below

Website: http://festa.kristang.com/

Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/kodrahkristang/

Email: kodrah@kristang.com

Do help to Pay It Forward and Pass It On, share it with your family, relatives and friends on the Festa di Papia Kristang! Let’s help to keep our diverse history, heritage and culture of Singapore alive and strong, not just for the current generation, also for the future generations and beyond.

* Information and picture courtesy of Kodrash Kristang *

Joseon Korea: Court Treasures and City Life

Korean Wave fans in Singapore rejoice! A new and limited time Korean Wave is now here in Singapore, at the Asian Civilisations Museum! This special limited time Korean Wave started on 22nd April 2017 to 23rd July 2017. Fans who love Korean Wave, especially Korean period dramas, this special exhibition is something you must not miss! Inside the Joseon Korea exhibition, get up close and have a good view of the many different types of treasures, fashion, history, heritage and culture that you saw in Korean dramas.

On 21st April, I was honoured to be invited to attend the official opening of the Joseon Korea: Court Treasures and City Life special exhibition at Asian Civilisations Museum. Mr Kennie Ting, Director of Asian Civilisations Museum, gave the opening speech on this special Joseon Korea: Court Treasures and City Life exhibition

ACM Director Kennie Ting said, “Fans of K-culture will not find this showcase unfamiliar, as many of the stories and treasures that we are showing in this exhibition have inspired Korea’s popular culture – from period drama series to contemporary arts and aesthetics, and even fashion. Much of what is regarded as traditionally Korean today had been developments and innovations during the Joseon period. In the same thread, South Korean artist Ran Hwang’s art installation adds to the experience of the exhibition, with its contemporary interpretation of Korean traditions. The Joseon dynasty’s extraordinary legacy not only withstands the test of time by being relevant to this day, but also resonates with new audiences beyond geographical boundaries.”

The Guest of Honour was Ms. Grace Fu, Minister for Culture, Community and Youth, who officially declared this special exhibition opened, accompanied and attended by many distinguished dignitaries and guests of the Asian Civilisations Museum. A grand occasion with traditional beautiful Korean cultural performances that delighted the guests present at the official opening event.

After watching the traditional Korean performances, I visited the exhibition together with my friends. The Joseon Korea: Court Treasures and City Life exhibition is divided into 6 sections –

  • Departing from the Goryeo kingdom sets the stage with an introduction of the transition between two dynasties, including key episodes and figures like King Taejo of Joseon, whose changes and ideas laid the foundation for the dynasty. His move to adopt Neo-Confucianism distinguished a new era for Korea, and shaped its political and cultural life;
  • Royal authority and court culture unveils life inside the royal palace, the roles and expectations of the king and queen, courtly rituals and ceremonies, and even costumes, food and music. The calculated pomp and pageantry that surrounded them was central to asserting the royal authority, and the King’s multiple roles as leader, ruler and scholar;
  • The yangban, which looks at the elite and aristocratic class in Joseon. Considered the moral pillar of Joseon society, their adherence to Confucian ideals and hierarchical values translated to their daily lives and in their living spaces. This examination of the yangban’s public and private lives paints a picture of their prominence, priorities and pursuits;
  • Nature in Korean Art depicts the importance of nature to Joseon artists – not just as inspiration, but also the material for their creations. Among the showcase are traditional buncheong stoneware, popular during the first two centuries of the Joseon dynasty, and the characteristically Korean style of ‘true-view’ landscape paintings that reflect the socio-political climate of developing a distinct Korean identity;
  • Sacred art and religious traditions provides insight to the influence of Confucianism and Buddhism in Joseon ritual life – from grand state ceremonies to private family religious practices. Beyond the connections of the living to their forefathers and enhanced solidarity among kin through such traditions, how Buddhism integrated with indigenous folk religion for mass reception is also examined; and
  • Streets of Hanyang: Everyday life of the people, depicting life in the capital through genre paintings – a major form of Korean art that flourished in the 18th  These vignettes candidly capture everyday life, societal classes, and how important occasions like the first day of the Lunar New Year, harvest festival Chuseokand individual rites of passage were celebrated.

(Information courtesy of Asian Civilisations Museum press release)

I do watch selected Korean dramas, therefore, I was able to relate and understand some of the items that were exhibited inside this exhibition. Some exhibits were intriguing and I was able to learn more about Korean history, heritage and culture.

The paintings and artworks on display were a real eye-opener for me, especially some of the paintings that were quite long in the length and the amount of delicate and skilful display of people on the paintings.

Having watched a small number of Korean dramas that showcased the Joseon dynasty, I got excited when I saw the clothing on display! This was as close as getting to learn more about Korean history, heritage and culture in Singapore since I haven’t visit Korea yet! (Ok, I think it’s high time that I plan a travel photography holiday to Korea)

From artwork, paintings, furniture, fashion, clothing, manuscripts and artefacts, this is a very meticulously curated special exhibition on Korea’s Joseon Dynasty, right here in Singapore, at the Asian Civilisations Museum.

I wasn’t able to view everything on display at the Joseon Korea: Court Treasures and City Life during the official opening event. Therefore, I have to visit the exhibition and add on more photographs to share with my readers here!

To all the Korean Wave (especially Korean drama) fans in Singapore, the Joseon Korea: Court Treasures and City Life special exhibition is definitely worth a visit! While it is not exactly visiting a Korean drama production setup, entering into the world of Joseon Dynasty, you are able to learn more about them and appreciate the Korean drama period shows even better!

I would like to thank Asian Civilisations Museum for the invitation to Joseon Korea: Court Treasures and City Life official opening event and the opportunity to tour the exhibition.

Key information on Joseon Korea: Court Treasures and City Life special exhibition

Location: Asian Civilisations Museum

Period: 22nd April 2017 to 23rd July 2017

Ticketing:

  Price
Singaporeans and Permanent Residents (Adults) $10
Singaporeans and Permanent Residents (Concession: Seniors, Students, NSF*) Free
Non-Residents (Adults) $15
Non-Residents (Concession: Seniors, Students*) $10
Non-Residents (Family of 5) $45

Website: www.acm.org.sg

The Universe and Art at ArtScience Museum

The night has fallen, when you look up into the night skyline, filled with bright shining stars, do you ask yourself, is there life in the universe and beyond? Are we able to live in the other planets in the solar system? Why is the universe so mysterious? Is there an explaination to anything besides the universe? How did the human race seek to learn, unravel and discover the universe over the centuries?

In order to seek some answers to the questions above, why not visit the ArtScience Museum in Singapore and enter into the world of The Universe and Art? This is is a very special, intriguing and it can also be a pretty abstract exhibition that unravels the human race journey over the centuries, understanding the Universe through arts, religion and philosophies, and not just science and engineering.

This exhibition, The Universe and Art at ArtScience Museum, is jointly curated and organised by Mori Art Museum in Tokyo and ArtScience Museum. Featuring over 120 original artworks, scientific artefacts and manuscripts, this exhibition presents visions of the Universe from across the globe and through the centuries. Exhibiting alongside masterpieces from around the world, are important artefacts on loan from Singapore’s Asian Civilisations Museum, and a newly commissioned installation by British sculptor, Conrad Shawcross.

Entering into the world of The Universe and Art, there are 4 parts for the visitors to view, learn and immerse into the our mysterious universe

Historical cosmologies

The first part of the exhibition focus on historical cosmologies from around the world, including religious arts from the Buddhist, Hindu and Jain traditions, on loan from Asian Civilisations Museum in Singapore. Visitors can also view the masterpieces by Copernicus, Galileo, Kepler, and Newton, on display for the first time in Singapore.

New scientific thinking on the Universe

The second part focus on scientific thinking of the Universe by contemporary artists including Björn Dahlem, Mariko Mori, Andreas Gursky, and the new commission by Conrad Shawcross.

Origin of life in the cosmos

The third part explores the origin of life in the cosmos, through artworks by major figures, such as Pierre Huyghe, Hiroshi Sugimoto, Laurent Grasso, and Patricia Piccinini.

Life in space

The fourth part of the exhibition is about pondering life in space, through the work of historical pioneer, Konstantin Tsiolkovsky, and contemporary artists including Arthur Woods, Kitsuo Dubois, Takuro Osaka, and Dragan Živadinov.

The commissioned work by Conrad Shawcross caught my attention, his artwork is titled “Slow Arc inside a Cube VIII”. Shawcross amazing commissioned artwork is a kinetic sculpture inspired by science. With the world’s technology improved vastly over the centuries, radical new theories and vast international space endeavours, the Universe is still like a mystery to us human beings on Earth, there is still so much unknown. Shawcross created this artwork to invite us and make us ponder on the unknown and mysteries of the Universe.

Through the selected photgraphs that I took at The Universe and Art and shared inside my Flickr collection, this special and unique exhibition is something worth visiting, for everybody to learn and understand more about the human race, arts, culture, our planet Mother Earth and the Universe beyond. Do visit the ArtScience Museum website for more information on the programmes organised by the ArtScience Museum that visitors can participate and join.

As I left the ArtScience Museum at Marina Bay Sands, away from the The Universe and Art exhibition, I asked myself again, “Is there life beyond the Universe and our planet Mother Earth?”

I don’t have an answer, I may never have an answer. However, I did learn more about the mysteries and beauty of the Universe through the arts.

I would like to thank ArtScience Museum and Asian Civilisations Museum for the invitation to the The Universe and Art exhibition.

Key information and details on The Universe and Art at ArtScience Museum

Exhibition period: 1st April to 30th July 2017

Tickets can be purchased from Marina Bay Sands box offices and website. Terms and conditions apply.

Ticket prices:

The Universe and Art

Standard Ticket (SGD$) Adult $17
Seniors (65 years and above) $14
Child (2-12 years) $10
Family package (2 kids and 2 adults) $44
Singapore Residence (SGD$) Adult $14
Seniors (65 years and above) $11
Child (2-12 years) $7
Family package (2 kids and 2 adults) $35

The Universe and Art + Future World

Standard Ticket (SGD$) Adult $28
Seniors (65 years and above) $24
Child (2-12 years) $17
Family package (2 kids and 2 adults) $73
Singapore Residence (SGD$) Adult $24
Seniors (65 years and above) $20
Child (2-12 years) $12
Family package (2 kids and 2 adults) $60

For more information on the exhibition, please visit www.marinabaysands.com/ArtScienceMuseum


Created with flickr slideshow.

Christianity in Asia: Sacred Art and Visual Splendour Special Exhibition

The Asian Civilisations Museum (ACM) in Singapore is now holding a very special exhibition, this is also their inaugural special exhibition after their extensive revamp last year. This special exhibition is titled “Christianity in Asia: Sacred Art and Visual Splendour” and this is also the world’s first exhibition on the history and spread of Christian art in Asia.

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This Christianity in Asia exhibition is very special and unique, it’s not just learning more about Christianity, this is an exhibition whereby you can learn and understand more on the spread of Christianity in Asia since the 7th Century, how Asia played a part in this spread and how Asian art absorbed the influences from many different cultures, including those from the countries such as the Middle East, India, China, Japan, the Philippines and Southeast Asia.

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When you visit this exhibition, you are able to view some very amazing and priceless exhibits dating back to the 13th century to the 20th century, with a special focus on the period from 16th to 18th century, the period where significant trade and missions took place. There are over 150 objects from six countries – Singapore, France, Portugal, Italy, Hong Kong and the Philippines and 20 acclaimed institutions and private collections from around the world, including the Musee du Louvre, the Bibliotheque nationale de France and Lisbon’s National Musuem of Ancient Art, that are showcased in this special exhibition at the Asian Civilisations Museum.

Here are some of the curators thoughts on this exhibition

Director of the ACM, Dr Alan Chong, said: “Christian art in Asia was created by artists of many different faiths: Hindu, Muslim, Buddhist, Confucian, and so on. New motifs and materials were used in these objects, which reflect many heritages. Moreover, many of the images were collected by patrons who were non-Christian. This demonstrates the curiosity and openness evident throughout Asia, especially in the 16th and 17th centuries.” 

Clement Onn, curator at ACM and of the exhibition, said, “The Christianity in Asia exhibition is a celebration of artistic innovation, experimentation and the diversity which emerges from cross-cultural influences. Through the curation of the exhibition, we hope that visitors will not just be exposed to the wide array of Asian Christian art, recognised by its intrinsic quality, originality and aesthetic merit, but also learn that common threads such as religion can also bring people of various cultures and from different countries together.”

Source: Asian Civilisations Museum press release

The exhibition is organised into 4 thematic sections: Early Christian Art in Asia, Asian Art with Christian themes, Christian missions to Asia in the 16th to 19th centuries (The Indian Subcontinent, China, Japan, Philippines and Southeast Asia) and lastly, a case study of Singapore. What makes this exhibition special and unique is learning and understanding how local artists and artisans (who may not be Christians themselves) in their particular era interpret Christianity, how they adapted the Christian themes into their artworks.

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During the curator tour of the Christianity in Asia: Sacred Art and Visual Splendour Exhibition, there is a particular artwork, just one of them that caught my attention among the many other special and precious artworks on display there.

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The photograph above that I took at the exhibition would be an inlaid metal candlestick made in Syria between 1248 and 1249. This was decorated with both Christian scenes and medieval Islamic art. Visit the Christianity in Asia: Sacred Art and Visual Splendour Exhibition at ACM, keep a lookout for this artwork, observe and identify the scenes near the base.

When you visit the exhibition, I strongly encourage you to download the ACM app into your smartphone and bring along your earphones/headphones. Upon starting your tour of this exhibition, it would make it experiential, engaged and a lot more interesting.

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At this particular artwork display inside the exhibition, put on your earphones/headphones, use the app, look at the artwork and listen to the sound!

If you prefer a more in-depth understanding and wanting to learn more from this special exhibition, I strongly encourage you to sign up for the curator tour, not only are they the exhibition/subject matter experts, they are great museum guides too! They are more than willing to share with the visitors on the curator tour! Check out the photographs that I took during the visit to this special exhibition!

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Upcoming Curator Tour information for Christianity in Asia special exhibition

Dates: Friday 26th August 2016 and Friday 9th September 2016

Time: 7.30 to 8.30pm
Fee: $25 per session (book at ACM Front Desk or Peatix) (http://acmcuratortours.peatix.com/)

Here are some key information, dates and details of the exhibition –

Christianity in Asia: Sacred Art and Visual Splendour(圣辉艺彩:亚洲的基督教信仰与艺术交汇

Exhibition Dates: 27 May to 11 September 2016

Venue: Asian Civilisations Museum

1 Empress Place, Singapore 179555

Website: www.acm.org.sg

Enquiries: 6332 7798 / nhb_acm_vs@nhb.gov.sg

Opening hours: Monday to Sunday: 10am to 7pm (to 9pm on Friday)

Getting There: By MRT – Raffles Place

By Bus – 75, 100, 107, 130, 131, 167

By Car – Parking is available at Parliament House, Connaught

Drive, The Fullerton Hotel, One Fullerton, and Six Battery Road

Ticketing

Admission to Special Exhibition, Christianity in Asia: Sacred Art and Visual Splendour

Singapore Citizens & Permanent Residents Non-Citizens & Non-Permanent Residents
Adults $9 $15
Students Free $10
Seniors (60 years and above) Free $10
Person with Disabilities Free $10
NSFs Free N.A.
MOE Teachers Free N.A.
Children 6 years and below Free Free
Foreign Family (5 person max) N.A. $45

This Special Exhibition, Christianity in Asia: Sacred Art and Visual Splendour at Asian Civilisations Museum, is really an eye-opener for me, it’s really special and unique. Moreover, it’s very educational and a great learning time for me when I visited it, to learn about history, arts, heritage, culture, preservation, in different parts of the world and also how it plays a part in early Singapore’s history and community.

* I would like to thank Asian Civilisations Museum for the invitation to the Christianity in Asia: Sacred Art and Visual Splendour Special Exhibition and joining the curator tour. *

 

Jubilee Walk – A History and Heritage Walkabout in Singapore

Going for a walkabout in any city, town or country is one of the best (interesting and fun too!) ways to enjoy the views of the city, to learn the history, heritage and culture of the country and its people. A walkabout is suitable for both locals and international visitors alike, a meaningful and experiential experience for all.

Singapore celebrated her Golden Jubilee year in 2015, with lots of festivities and celebrations throughout the year. During the year 2015, Singaporeans started to learn and know more about her rich history, heritage, culture and society that goes further back and beyond the first 50 years of independence in 1965, to the days when she was a thriving port and trading hub during her Colonial days.

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While Singapore’s history may not be as long as compared to others, she does have her own unique stories to tell and share that she went through to reach her status today. By embarking on the Jubilee Walk, you can walk and go through the flow of time to learn, experience and see Singapore’s heritage from her Temasek era to Colonial era, nationhood, modernisation and metamorphosis into the modern urban city today. Over a distance of 8km, the Jubilee Walkers would be able to see and feel the experiences of history, heritage, culture and society of Singapore. It’s like walking through a warp time zone, from the past to the present and into the future, starting from the National Museum of Singapore, ending at the Marina Barrage.

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I went for a Jubilee Walk Guided Tour (5km distance) with fellow photographer, social media and heritage friends recently. The starting/meeting point is the National Museum of Singapore and the end point is Esplanade – Theatres on the Bay. Our guide, Marcus Ng, is very experienced and friendly, sharing a lot about the various history and heritage stories during the Jubilee Walk Guided Tour.

Here’s a short summary of the locations that we walked to during the Guided Tour ~

National Museum of Singapore -> Fort Canning Park -> Peranakan Museum -> Singapore Philatelic Museum and National Archives of Singapore -> Armenian Apostolic Church of St. Gregory the Illuminator -> Central Fire Station -> Old Hill Street Police Station -> The Singapore River -> Asian Civilisations Museum.

Along the Jubilee Walk route, you are able to find interesting artefacts, artworks, historical monuments, landmarks etc. Here are some of the photographs that I took during the Jubilee Walk Guided Tour, keep a lookout for them! Due to our eager and enthusaistic participation and interaction with our guide Marcus, our walking pace slowed down and we had to end the Guided Tour at Asian Civilisations Musuem due to time constraints. Thank you National Heritage Board for organising the Jubilee Walk Guided Tour!

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Nevertheless, I am planning to continue from where we left off from the Guided Tour and do my own second half Jubilee Walk walkabout on my own or with my fellow photographer and heritage friends.

The Jubilee Walk is suitable for both locals and international visitors, you can also download the maps and app into your smartphone or tablet and you are good to go ahead with your Jubilee Walk walkabout! I have prepared some tips (with some help from the friendly folks at National Heritage Board) for the Jubilee Walkers who would like to go on their own Jubilee Walk walkabout.

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Tips for Jubilee Walkers

  • Wear comfortable clothes and shoes
  • Bring water along the Jubilee Walk
  • Bring along an umbrella or raincoat (just a precaution)
  • Bring along your hat and wear it
  • Start your walk from the late afternoon (e.g. 4pm) when it is not too hot and you can reach Marina Bay/Gardens By The Bay/Marina Barrage around 7pm (depending on your walking pace) to enjoy the Singapore sunset view
  • Get hold of the Jubilee Walk booklet or download the Time Walk app and maps into your smartphone or tablet
  • Don’t carry too heavy and too many things during the walk
  • Keep a lookout for the SG50 markers along the Jubilee Walk route
  • Enjoy and have fun! Take more photographs and share them on social media with the following hashtags #JubileewalkSG, #Funwithheritage, #jubileewalkSGguidedtours
  • If you can’t finish the walk in one sesssion (due to time constraints or bad weather), don’t fret, you can always come back on another day to continue with your Jubilee Walk from the last point where you left off

Useful links

If you like to join a Jubilee Walk Guided Tour, check out this link on the Guided Tour dates and availability.

Have a good walkabout on the Jubilee Walk in Singapore! Enjoy and have fun walkabout into Singapore’s history and heritage from the past, to the present and into the future!


Created with flickr slideshow.

Regenerating Communities – Regenerating Puppetry in Singapore

Puppetry, a form of performing arts/theatre, involving the use and manipulation of puppets. This performing art dates back very long ago and it’s an ancient art form, originating 30,000 years (Source : Wikipedia). In modern times today, some performing arts are facing huge challenges, lesser people knows about puppetry, some even didn’t know about their existence, the younger generation today are influenced heavily by modern pop music, while the older generation that watches & enjoys puppetry, are slowly declining in numbers and probably didn’t pass the interest and passion of watching puppetry to their next generations.

For myself, I confessed that I didn’t know much about puppetry in Singapore, its origins and what it brings to the society. Therefore, it was a wonderful opportunity to be enlightened from watching, learning, photographing and documenting Sin Hoe Ping Puppet Troupe performing at Regenerating Communities at Empress Place on 17th February 2012. Regenerating Communities at Empress Place is a special 3 part arts and culture initiative featuring artists, art forms and programmes that draws Singapore’s rich heritage and culture, to bring it back to Empress Place, revitalise and reaffirm Empress Place as a heritage place. About the history of Sin Hoe Ping Puppet Troupe, although she was registered in 1981, her history dates back to before 1930s when it was known as De Yue Ban (德月班) in Putian, China.

First and foremost, I have to thank Belinda Tan, for organising and coordinating, without her liaison and leadership, the group of photographers, bloggers, social media enthusiasts and arts enthusiasts, would not be able to gather over 16th and 17th February 2012 at ACM Green to watch Sin Hoe Ping Puppet Troupe performing, going to the back stage, capturing artists preparing the puppets, performing, playing musical instruments and singing. On top of that, we had many opportunities with Mr Yang Lai Hao (the puppet troupe leader of Sin Hoe Ping Puppet Troupe) for interviews, photo taking and listening to his puppetry experiences.

During the 2 days of puppetry performances, the audience were entertained 3 awesome performances

6pm – Journey to the West

7pm – Monkey’s Wedding

8pm – Wu Song Fights the Tiger

Puppetry is not just abt movements & the puppets, the artists behind controls the puppet, sings and all of these give the puppetry a special aura of live performance, storytelling in her own unique ways, supported by Chinese musical instruments producing the music.

This was a very enriching and humbling experience for me, I never watched a puppetry performance in Singapore before. Therefore, it was a very rare opportunity to get so up close and personal to learn and watch something new to me, a performing arts that faces a very difficult future ahead in Singapore, due to succession for this form of puppetry arts performance and getting people of young and old to be interested in traditional arts performances.

Currently embarked and sailing onwards to my personal exploration journey, to seek, photograph and document, history, culture and heritage in my home land, Singapore, of disappearing Old Places, Old Trades, helping and supporting protection, conservation, preservation of heritage, history and culture, from Bukit Brown to The Green Corridor. I will do my part to document, photograph, write and share on puppetry in Singapore, with the coverage of Sin Hoe Ping Art Troupe performance during Regenerating Communities at Empress Place.

Mr Yang Lai Hao, the leader of Sin Hoe Ping Puppet Troupe, is currently searching for a successor to continue this beautiful ancient puppetry art performance, to continue the legacy of his forefathers and to keep this traditional art form alive into the future, for the future generations. I sincerely hope that his cousin from Putian, China, will be able to take over him and lead puppetry into the next few generations. Please kindly grant him the necessary paperwork and documentations to allow him to come over to Singapore and continue the legacy of puppetry. 

Check out more photos here on my Flickr! Let’s all do something to help keep our arts, traditions, cultures and heritage alive! Spread the word, support Sin Hoe Ping Puppet Troupe and we all can learn from them!


Created with Admarket’s flickrSLiDR.

Thoughts & Reflections From The Unguarded Moment

When I was a little boy growing up, my dad was influential, along with my uncles and cousin, introducing me to the world of photography and I recalled “playing” with his Pentax ME Super (not really working now) and later a Nikon F401X (in our little museum), before settling down with the Canon 30D today.

I collected and read National Geographic Magazines, although I had stopped collecting them (Not that I don’t support them, just that, I don’t know how and where to store them !!). There was a photo that caught my attention when I was very young and I still remembered it till today. Yesterday, at the exhibition The Unguarded Moment, on the last day of the exhibition, held at the Asian Civilisations Museum.

I finally saw it right in front of me with my very own eyes, a world class masterpiece that captured many hearts worldwide – The Afghan Girl by Steve McCurry. Viewing through Steve McCurry’s world class photographs, it was amazing, they were so powerful and delivered many different messages across to viewers, intriguing, evoking emotions in the subjects and us viewers, introducing cultural and societal situations, perspectives and practices into our eyes, heart and soul. A true master in photography, looking through his masterpieces, a great learning journey too for me.

Steve was in Singapore recently and I didn’t grab the chance to join the local photographers sessions and meet him in person ! Hopefully, when Steve is back in Singapore again, I would be able to do so. I was very happy that I visited Steve’s The Unguarded Moment photography exhibition on its last day and returning home later, I started researching, reading, admiring and learning Steve McCurry’s sites, photography works and blog.

Steve McCurry on Magnum Photos

Steve McCurry Photography

Steve McCurry’s Blog

Reflecting on how I can learn and improve on my photography, there was a quote abstract by Steve McCurry – “But what matters most is that each picture stands on its own, with its own place and feeling.”

Another little step into improving my photography ………