(Abandoned) Railway Track Photo Walkabout

The KTM Malaysian Railway Lines in Singapore, goes back quite a long way in history in time and it’s an important and integral part of the history of Singapore and Malaysia. In the early days, there were railway lines from the western part of Singapore, from the industrial estate in Jurong to the main railway line along Bukit Timah to Tanjong Pagar. However, as time and economics changed, the railway was no longer in use for a period of time, while the railway line from Tanjong Pagar up to Malaysia is still in operation.

View KTM Malayan Railway Lines in Singapore in a larger map

With the recent changes to the future of the railway tracks and Tanjong Pagar Railway Station, agreements between the governments of Singapore and Malaysia is leading towards a new era for the railway lines in Singapore, what will happen to them? Will they survive the thirst of land scarce Singapore? Can the railway lines, there are or going to be no longer in use, be turned into Green Corridors?

Armed with the strong interest inside me, I read, followed and researched on various other blogs, photographs and details on a segment of the railway lines in Singapore. Thereafter, I decided to do the Teban Gardens to Sunset Way (Abandoned) Railway Track Photo Walkabout with Sue and Amanda. Using the KTM Malaysian Railway Line Track (on Google Maps) as a reference, we started at Block 9, Teban Garden Road, recognising the landmarks from friends photographs, we hiked under the bridge, into a tunnel and came out on the diagonal side of Ayer Rajah Expressway and Jurong Town Hall Road.

There were strong evidence of the abandoned railway track (coming out from the tunnel) and onto a small ridge line, the next stretch was pretty challenging with tall grass, thick bushes and streams. Observing from our route of advance, it was like 2 mini valleys and the valley on the left side was a stream, while the right side was still quite alright for hiking/bashing through, this route is not easy and can be quite tiring, on top of being careful on where you are hiking/bashing through. During this stretch, there weren’t any more evidence of the railway track until the side of Sungei Ulu Pandan, whereby we spotted the first railway track bridge and it’s closed by the authorities currently.

We had quite a bit of rest there, on the park connector side of Sungei Ulu Pandan, to dry our socks and shoes, before taking photographs of the railway bridge, crossing over along the expressway bridge to Faber Heights estate. At this area, we were able to find more distinct features of the former railway track lines, the railway track beams, bolts, wooden blocks and granite rocks. We had quite a good time with photography of historical railway tracks here, took a rest too before I made a decision to amend my route of advance.

Due to changing weather (potentially rain coming), I decided against walking through Faber Heights and decided to “cut through” Faber Heights private housing area, managed to get a drinks refill break at a provision store, moving out to Jalan Lempeng and walking across the road to Clementi Avenue 6 housing blocks. I am very familiar with this part of the area since my former primary school (Clementi North Primary School) is just around the corner and I was able to lead and “take shortcut” towards the Sunset Way side.

Reaching Clementi Avenue 4 housing blocks, being a local neighbourhood boy, I found my dirt track entry point and from this stretch onwards, it’s one of the better preserved railway track lines. Along this stretch, I was very happy, kind of getting back to my primary school days, of fun, play and no pressures. Small farms, temple, beautiful greenery before reaching the pinnacle of this photography walkabout, the Sunset Way Railway Bridge. Check out my flickr for the photos !

Looking back at this abandoned railway track lines, will it stand the test of Singapore’s history and future developments ?

Created with Admarket’s flickrSLiDR.

10 thoughts on “(Abandoned) Railway Track Photo Walkabout”

  1. Looking at the above pics….I remember arriving in Singapore from Malaysia back in 1991 and crossing through that same steel bridge. Things change fast in Singapore!

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